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Google Professional Cloud Network Engineer Exam

Exam Name: Professional Cloud Network Engineer
Exam Code: Professional Cloud Network Engineer
Related Certification(s): Google Cloud Certified Certification
Certification Provider: Google
Number of Professional Cloud Network Engineer practice questions in our database: 173 (updated: Jun. 10, 2024)
Expected Professional Cloud Network Engineer Exam Topics, as suggested by Google :
  • Topic 1: Managing and monitoring network operations/ Designing a container IP addressing plan for Google Kubernetes Engine
  • Topic 2: Optimizing network resources/ Load balancer and CDN location/ Designing a hybrid network. Considerations Using interconnect, Failover and disaster recovery strategy
  • Topic 3: Designing the overall network architecture. Considerations Hybrid connectivity, Container networking, Options for high availability
  • Topic 4: Implementing a GCP Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)/ Creating a shared VPC and explaining how to share subnets with other projects
  • Topic 5: Differences between Google Cloud Networking and other cloud platforms/ Designing, planning, and prototyping a GCP network
  • Topic 6: Configuring and maintaining Google Kubernetes Engine clusters/ Configuring and maintaining Google Kubernetes Engine clusters
  • Topic 7: Configuring GCP VPC resources/ Failover and disaster recovery strategy/ Target network tags and service accounts
  • Topic 8: Shared vs. standalone VPC interconnect access/ Choosing the appropriate load balancing options
  • Topic 9: Microsegmentation for security purposes/ Designing a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)/ VPC-native clusters using alias IPs
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Free Google Professional Cloud Network Engineer Exam Actual Questions

Note: Premium Questions for Professional Cloud Network Engineer were last updated On Jun. 10, 2024 (see below)

Question #1

You are designing an IP address scheme for new private Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) clusters. Due to IP address exhaustion of the RFC 1918 address space In your enterprise, you plan to use privately used public IP space for the new clusters. You want to follow Google-recommended practices. What should you do after designing your IP scheme?

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Correct Answer: D

This answer follows the Google-recommended practices for using privately used public IP (PUPI) addresses for GKE Pod address blocks1. The benefits of this approach are:

It allows you to use any public IP addresses that are not owned by Google or your organization for your Pods, which can help mitigate address exhaustion in your enterprise.

It prevents any external traffic from reaching your Pods, as Google Cloud does not route PUPI addresses to the internet or to other VPC networks by default.

It enables you to use VPC Network Peering to connect your GKE cluster to other VPC networks that use different PUPI addresses, as long as you enable the export and import of custom routes for the peering connection.

It preserves the fully integrated network model of GKE, where Pods can communicate with nodes and other resources in the same VPC network without NAT.

The options that you need to select when creating a private GKE cluster with PUPI addresses are:

--disable-default-snat: This option disables source NAT for outbound traffic from Pods to destinations outside the cluster's VPC network.This is necessary to prevent Pods from using RFC 1918 addresses as their source IP addresses, which could cause conflicts with other networks that use the same address space2.

--enable-ip-alias: This option enables alias IP ranges for Pods and Services, which allows you to use separate subnet ranges for them.This is required to use PUPI addresses for Pods1.

--enable-private-nodes: This option creates a private cluster, where nodes do not have external IP addresses and can only communicate with the control plane through a private endpoint.This enhances the security and privacy of your cluster3.

Option A is incorrect because it does not use PUPI addresses for Pods, but rather RFC 1918 addresses. This does not solve the problem of address exhaustion in your enterprise. Option B is incorrect because it reuses the secondary address range for Services across multiple private GKE clusters, which could cause IP conflicts and routing issues. Option C is incorrect because it does not specify the options that are needed to create a private GKE cluster with PUPI addresses.

1:Configuring privately used public IPs for GKE | Kubernetes Engine | Google Cloud2:Using Cloud NAT with GKE | Kubernetes Engine | Google Cloud3:Private clusters | Kubernetes Engine | Google Cloud


Question #2

You are a network administrator at your company planning a migration to Google Cloud and you need to finish the migration as quickly as possible, To ease the transition, you decided to use the same architecture as your on-premises network' a hub-and-spoke model. Your on-premises architecture consists of over 50 spokes. Each spoke does not have connectivity to the other spokes, and all traffic IS sent through the hub for security reasons. You need to ensure that the Google Cloud architecture matches your on-premises architecture. You want to implement a solution that minimizes management overhead and cost, and uses default networking quotas and limits. What should you do?

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Correct Answer: D

The correct answer is D because it meets the following requirements:

It matches the hub-and-spoke model of the on-premises network, where each spoke is a separate VPC network that is connected to a central hub VPC network.

It minimizes management overhead and cost, because VPC Network Peering is a simple and low-cost way to connect VPC networks without using any external IP addresses or VPN gateways1.

It uses default networking quotas and limits, because VPC Network Peering does not consume any quota or limit for VPN tunnels, external IP addresses, or forwarding rules2.

It prevents connectivity between the spokes, because VPC Network Peering is non-transitive by default, meaning that a spoke can only communicate with the hub, not with other spokes1.To enforce this restriction, a third-party network appliance can be used as a default gateway in each spoke VPC network, which can filter out any traffic destined for other spokes3.

Option A is incorrect because it does not minimize cost, as Cloud VPN charges for egress traffic and requires external IP addresses for the VPN gateways4.Option B is incorrect because it does not prevent connectivity between the spokes, as VPC Network Peering allows direct communication between peered VPC networks by default1. Option C is incorrect because it does not minimize cost or use default quotas and limits, for the same reasons as option A.


VPC Network Peering overview | VPC

Quotas and limits | VPC

Hub-and-spoke network architecture | Cloud Architecture Center

Cloud VPN overview | Google Cloud

Question #3

Your company is planning a migration to Google Kubernetes Engine. Your application team informed you that they require a minimum of 60 Pods per node and a maximum of 100 Pods per node Which Pod per node CIDR range should you use?

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Correct Answer: B

To determine the Pod per node CIDR range, you need to calculate how many IP addresses are required for each node, and then choose the smallest CIDR range that can accommodate that number. A CIDR range of /n means that there are 2^(32-n) IP addresses available in that range. For example, a /24 range has 2^(32-24) = 256 IP addresses.

According to the question, the application team requires a minimum of 60 Pods per node and a maximum of 100 Pods per node. Therefore, you need to choose a CIDR range that can provide at least 100 IP addresses per node, but not more than necessary. A /25 range has 2^(32-25) = 128 IP addresses, which is enough for 100 Pods per node. A /26 range has 2^(32-26) = 64 IP addresses, which is not enough for 60 Pods per node. A /24 range has 256 IP addresses, which is more than needed and wastes IP address space. A /28 range has 2^(32-28) = 16 IP addresses, which is far too small for any node.

Therefore, the best option is B. /25.This is also consistent with the Google Kubernetes Engine documentation, which states that each node is allocated a /24 range of IP addresses for Pods by default, but the maximum number of Pods per node is 1101. This means that there are approximately twice as many available IP addresses as possible Pods, which is similar to the ratio of 128 to 100 in the /25 range.

1:Configure maximum Pods per node | Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) | Google Cloud


Question #4

You are a network administrator at your company planning a migration to Google Cloud and you need to finish the migration as quickly as possible, To ease the transition, you decided to use the same architecture as your on-premises network' a hub-and-spoke model. Your on-premises architecture consists of over 50 spokes. Each spoke does not have connectivity to the other spokes, and all traffic IS sent through the hub for security reasons. You need to ensure that the Google Cloud architecture matches your on-premises architecture. You want to implement a solution that minimizes management overhead and cost, and uses default networking quotas and limits. What should you do?

Reveal Solution Hide Solution
Correct Answer: D

The correct answer is D because it meets the following requirements:

It matches the hub-and-spoke model of the on-premises network, where each spoke is a separate VPC network that is connected to a central hub VPC network.

It minimizes management overhead and cost, because VPC Network Peering is a simple and low-cost way to connect VPC networks without using any external IP addresses or VPN gateways1.

It uses default networking quotas and limits, because VPC Network Peering does not consume any quota or limit for VPN tunnels, external IP addresses, or forwarding rules2.

It prevents connectivity between the spokes, because VPC Network Peering is non-transitive by default, meaning that a spoke can only communicate with the hub, not with other spokes1.To enforce this restriction, a third-party network appliance can be used as a default gateway in each spoke VPC network, which can filter out any traffic destined for other spokes3.

Option A is incorrect because it does not minimize cost, as Cloud VPN charges for egress traffic and requires external IP addresses for the VPN gateways4.Option B is incorrect because it does not prevent connectivity between the spokes, as VPC Network Peering allows direct communication between peered VPC networks by default1. Option C is incorrect because it does not minimize cost or use default quotas and limits, for the same reasons as option A.


VPC Network Peering overview | VPC

Quotas and limits | VPC

Hub-and-spoke network architecture | Cloud Architecture Center

Cloud VPN overview | Google Cloud

Question #5

Your company recently migrated to Google Cloud in a Single region. You configured separate Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) networks for two departments. Department A and Department B. Department A has requested access to resources that are part Of Department Bis VPC. You need to configure the traffic from private IP addresses to flow between the VPCs using multi-NIC virtual machines (VMS) to meet security requirements Your configuration also must

* Support both TCP and UDP protocols

* Provide fully automated failover

* Include health-checks

Require minimal manual Intervention In the client VMS

Which approach should you take?

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Correct Answer: D

The correct answer is D. Create an instance template and a managed instance group. Configure two separate internal TCP/UDP load balancers for each protocol (TCP/UDP), and configure the client VMs to use the internal load balancers' virtual IP addresses.

This answer is based on the following facts:

Using multi-NIC VMs as network virtual appliances (NVAs) allows you to route traffic between different VPC networks1. You can use NVAs to implement custom network policies and security requirements.

Using an instance template and a managed instance group allows you to create and manage multiple identical NVAs2. You can also use health checks and autoscaling policies to ensure high availability and reliability of your NVAs.

Using internal TCP/UDP load balancers allows you to distribute traffic from client VMs to NVAs based on the protocol and port3. You can also use health checks and failover policies to ensure that only healthy NVAs receive traffic.

Configuring the client VMs to use the internal load balancers' virtual IP addresses allows you to simplify the routing configuration and avoid manual intervention4. You do not need to create static routes or update them when NVAs are added or removed.

The other options are not correct because:

Option A is not suitable. Creating the VMs in the same zone does not provide high availability or failover. Using static routes with IP addresses as next hops requires manual intervention when NVAs are added or removed.

Option B is not optimal. Creating the VMs in different zones provides high availability, but not failover. Using static routes with instance names as next hops requires manual intervention when NVAs are added or removed.

Option C is not feasible. Creating an instance template and a managed instance group provides high availability and reliability, but using a single internal load balancer does not support both TCP and UDP protocols. You cannot define a custom static route with an internal load balancer as the next hop.



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