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Fortinet Exam NSE5_FMG-7.2 Topic 1 Question 6 Discussion

Actual exam question for Fortinet's NSE5_FMG-7.2 exam
Question #: 6
Topic #: 1
[All NSE5_FMG-7.2 Questions]

An administrator has added all the devices in a Security Fabric group to FortiManager.

How does the administrator identify the root FortiGate?

Show Suggested Answer Hide Answer
Suggested Answer: D

Contribute your Thoughts:

Janet
17 days ago
I believe it's actually marked by a dollar symbol ($) at the end of the device name.
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An
29 days ago
I think the root FortiGate can be identified by an Asterisk (*) at the end of the device name.
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Shay
18 days ago
I believe it is by an Asterisk (*) at the end of the device name.
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Adelle
2 months ago
Haha, a QUESTION NO: mark (?) at the end? That's a new one. I doubt Fortinet would use something that confusing. Gotta be the asterisk or the at symbol.
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Tarra
2 months ago
Haha, yeah, that's a good point, Glory. Maybe they're just trying to see if we actually know the proper way to identify the root FortiGate. I mean, who cares about these little symbols, am I right?
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Gregoria
2 months ago
You know, I was about to say the dollar sign ($), but then I realized that's usually used for variables or special characters, not device naming conventions. I'm leaning towards the asterisk (*) too.
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Mitzie
2 months ago
I think the asterisk (*) is the most likely choice here. It's a common way to denote a primary or root device in many systems.
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Stevie
1 months ago
I'm not completely confident, but I think it might be the dollar symbol ($) at the end of the device name.
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Rhea
1 months ago
Hmm, I still think it's the asterisk (*) that signifies the root device.
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Reta
1 months ago
I'm pretty sure it's the question mark (?) that marks the root FortiGate.
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Chu
1 months ago
Really? I always thought it was the at symbol (@) that identified the root device.
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Stephanie
1 months ago
I think it's actually the dollar symbol ($) that indicates the root FortiGate.
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Colette
1 months ago
I agree, the asterisk (*) is commonly used to indicate a root device.
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Glory
2 months ago
Hey, guys, isn't the root FortiGate usually the one with the highest serial number or something? I feel like I remember learning that somewhere. Anyone else recall that?
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Kent
2 months ago
Ah, I see what you mean, Dudley. This could be one of those questions where they're trying to see if we're really paying attention. I'm going to have to think about this one a bit more.
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Jerrod
2 months ago
Hmm, identifying the root FortiGate in a Security Fabric group seems straightforward, but I'm not sure which of these symbols is the correct indicator. Maybe the at symbol (@) since that's often used to denote a primary or master device?
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Amie
2 months ago
Hmm, I'm going to go with option D. The asterisk just seems like the most logical choice, you know? I mean, it's a common symbol used to denote something important or significant.
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Dudley
2 months ago
I don't know, I feel like this could be a trick question. I mean, why would they have us identify the root FortiGate by a symbol at the end of the device name? Seems a bit too obvious, don't you think?
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Ora
2 months ago
This question seems pretty straightforward, but I'm not sure I'm completely confident in the answer. I mean, how often do we really need to identify the root FortiGate in a Security Fabric group? Seems like a very specific scenario.
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